Maija Rhee Devine

Archive for September, 2013

Yonhap News article on my Kirkus review

Posted on: September 5th, 2013 by Maija Rhee Devine

Kim Hyun Rho, a news reporter for Yonhap News (Korean AP) in Chicago, did an article on 08/14/2013 about the Kirkus review The Voices of Heaven received.  Here’s the link (It’s in Korean!).

http://www.yonhapnews.co.kr/international/2013/08/14/0601180100AKR20130814044700009.HTML

Kirkus Review

Posted on: September 5th, 2013 by Maija Rhee Devine

The Voices of Heaven, my novel/love story set during the Korean War, received this review from Kirkus Review.  The review is published in Kirkus Review website.  The link is:

https://www.kirkusreviews.com/book-reviews/maija-rhee-devine/the-voices-of-heaven-AuvWtfPI/

This review is already on Amazon and spd (small press distribution) and will be posted in the websites of Kirkus Review’s affiliates including Google, Amazon, Barns & Noble, Ingram, Baker & Taylor, etc.

 

KIRKUS REVIEW, 08/07/2013

 

TITLE INFORMATION

THE VOICES OF HEAVEN

Devine, Maija Rhee

Seoul Selection (316 pp.)

$16.00 paperback, $9.99 e-book

ISBN: 978-1624120039; May 15, 2013

BOOK REVIEW

In Devine’s debut novel, war and traditional Confucianism tear apart an idyllic Korean family.
Eum-chun and her husband, Gui-yong, have been married for 15 years and are deeply in love. Although they adore their adopted daughter, Mi-Na, they fail to produce a son—a serious problem in their deeply traditional society. Gui-yong eventually gives in to his mother’s wishes and marries a second woman, Soo-yang, hoping she will deliver a boy to carry on the family name. Although Eum-chun tries to bear the situation bravely, she’s devastated, and cracks soon begin to form in the seemingly perfect family. The novel, set against the backdrop of the Korean War, follows four main characters as they navigate their new family and the chaos that ravages the land. Devine’s prose richly describes everyday life in 1950s Korea, and the war effectively parallels the battle raging in the family home—an insurmountable rift divides the family, just as it does their country. It’s a realistic sketch of a Korea that few Westerners have seen, depicting a patriarchal society that limits women’s choices, and each character faces a unique battle stemming from that unfortunate situation. Each of their stories is rich with emotion, and their problems give the novel depth and complexity. Most compelling are the struggles of Eum-chun, Mi-Na and Soo-yang as they fight to create their own identities; although they all fight similar battles, they cannot fight them together, as their society has driven wedges between them. Their resulting stories are often melancholy and achingly beautiful.
A complex, uniquely Korean love story that shouldn’t be missed.

 

Copyright © 2013 - 2014 Maija Rhee Devine. All Rights Reserved.

Website by PrefX

Find us on Google+